Simple Quilt Squares

I thought we would start with a pattern that will create 4" x 4" squares to start with, then you would put them together to create a 12" x12" quilt block.























What I like to do is either, print my pattern onto card stock and cut out carefully, but if you do not have card stock, use something that can be made into a template. You can use a paper template but after a time, the sewing pins make so many holes you have to reprint. My computer has been acting up, so I am going to show you how to cut your pieces onto a piece of card stock. You can always do card board or a file folder.


Nine (9) Square Quilt Pattern

The first quilt square you are going to do is a nine (9) square quilt. If you have scrap fabric, this is always a good project for this. If you are a beginner, do not go out and buy yards and yards of fabric. They sell pieces at Walmart, Joann's, Hobby Lobby and other fabric places called Fat Quarters. They are usually under $2.00 depending on where you shop.

I have enclosed a step by step video on how to do this nine square, but you will be using the same principles for your checkerboard quilt square, the diagonal quilt square and the triangle quilt square.


Remember, when pinning your squares or project together, face your fabrics together carefully. Pin them together, edging the fabric together, straight across. Remember if you can see your fabric on either side of the pin line, you will have to take it apart. We want a clean line.

Another rule in sewing is to lock your stitch, we have talked about this in my other blogs but remember to count to 5 when you are starting reverse your stitch back to the top then start to sew to the end of your project, this is where, you will reverse again to 5 and then finish to the end.


We always press our seams open, the iron should be an extension of your project to keep your seam pressed opened well and the face of your project, nice and crisp.


I hope you enjoy the video:


Checkerboard Pattern

Here is another way to create a 9 piece quilt square, but this time we are adding a pattern to it with two different fabrics. This is a checkerboard, you can see why they call it that, if you had more of them put together, you could create a real checkerboard. Here is how you put it together and you will be using the same principles that you used for the 9 square pieces.


Diagonal Square Pattern

Yet there is another way to create a 9 piece quilt square, but this time we are adding a pattern to it with three different fabrics. This is a diagonal, you can see why they call it that; your pattern is follow a diagonal and if you keep going, you will see an even more pronounce diagonal. Here is how you put it together and you will be using the same principles that you used for the 9 square pieces.


We are going to try a new quilt square with these various pieces.


Triangle Quilt Pattern

2 x 4 and 1 x 4 Quilt Pattern

2 x 2 Quilt Pattern

Let's put all of our quilt pieces together!

I took all my pieces, arranged them and sewed them together using the techniques for putting my squares together. I wanted to do this to show you that you can make any type of pattern and size quilt square you want; the art is yours. This one is a 16" x 16" quilt square and I do not know yet what I am going to make with it but I did want you to see that there are different ways to put your squares together.


Here is my finished 16" x 16" square.


Here are more ideas for your 12" x 12" squares:

I still do not know what I am going to do with my quilt squares but I now have a base for something in the future. I do hope you have enjoyed making your quilt squares. All these different pieces can help you to create those straight lines, to be patient and to love to sew.


Next week, we are making heart pillows for breast cancer patients. Valentine's Day is approaching, so I thought, what a great project to do and to donate what we make. I do hope you will follow us.


Love and world peace, Ms. Ida